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  #1  
Old 05-04-2010, 04:59 AM
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RickI RickI is offline
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Default Oil Spill - Source Plume & Blowout Mitigation Updates, Deep Horizon Blowout

"Deep Horizon" Spill Response Page
http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/go/site/2931/


Florida DEP page dealing with State response and tracking:
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/deepwaterhorizon/default.htm





UPDATED 5.6.10
NOAA is providing updates and oil dispersal modeling for the "Deepwater Horizon Incident, Gulf of Mexico"
at: http://tinyurl.com/Oil-Spill-Updates


Other full sized charts are available at: http://tinyurl.com/2787tcv



An html image that could be embedded on this page.
From: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uscgd8/4577185267/
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Last edited by RickI; 05-06-2010 at 02:10 PM.
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Old 05-04-2010, 08:43 PM
Water Monkey Water Monkey is offline
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Default good resources

Good information Rick. We have had some great wind since Saturday here in the bay area.

I am saddened and angered by the events unfolding with the oil spill. After riding the past few days I started to wonder if these might be the last few days of good wind in oil-free waters!? It sucks that we even have to think that way but the forecast is not looking good. I hope I'm wrong.....
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Old 05-04-2010, 09:21 PM
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"As BP announced small but positive steps Monday in its fight to contain a spewing oil well a mile below the surface of the Gulf of Mexico, southeast Louisiana parishes rallied their residents to brace their own defenses against the spill's attack on the local environment and economy.
Bad weather -- with some swells reported to reach 17 feet -- crimped response efforts during the weekend and much of Monday as crews around the Gulf region worked to contain the plume of oil rising unfettered since the oil rig Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20 and sank a day later. Officials estimate 210,000 gallons of light crude are leaking into offshore waters each day."
Continued at: http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-sp...lt_to_cap.html





"PORT FOURCHON, La. — BP PLC will place huge containment boxes over the well as the next available short-term strategy in fighting the Gulf oil spill.
BP spokesman Steve Rinehart said Sunday Wild Well Control is building three rectangular boxes that can be lowered onto each of the three leaks. The work is being conducted in Port Fourchon, La.
The concrete-and-steel chambers could be in place at the leak site in six to eight days.
Crews have had little success stemming the flow from the ruptured well on the sea floor off Louisiana or removing oil from the surface by skimming it, burning it or dispersing it with chemicals.
The blowout preventer typically activates after a blast or other event to cut off any oil that may spill. But Rinehart says the preventer failed."
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/...n/6986186.html



"ROBERT, La. - The Transocean drillship, Discoverer Enterprise, prepares to conduct recovery operation for BP using a specially-built "dome" at the sea floor Monday, May 3, 2010. With the use of the dome and connection system to flow the leaking oil the crew of the Discoverer Enterprise will be capable of recovering up to 125,000 barrels of oil. Photo provided by Transocean."
http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse....c/2931/538223/


"Fishing is halted on Gulf Coast as oil spill gets closer to shore

VENICE, La. | Federal officials shut down fishing from the Mississippi River to the Florida Panhandle on Sunday because of the uncontrolled gusher spewing massive amounts of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Although storms briefly grounded Coast Guard planes, reports of oil reaching land began coming in, along with confirmed sightings of dead sea turtles, crabs and birds washing ashore in Pass Christian, Miss.

The coast from Louisiana to Florida braced for the gooey mess on barrier islands of the Gulf Islands National Seashore and the sandy beaches and casino enclaves crucial to the region’s tourism industry"
---
"The plan involves lowering 74-ton, concrete-and-metal boxes into the gulf to capture the oil and siphon it to a barge waiting at the surface. Whether this will work for a leak 5,000 feet below the surface is anyone’s guess.

If it doesn’t, and efforts to activate a shutoff mechanism called a blowout preventer continue to prove fruitless, the oil probably will keep gushing for months until a second well can be dug to cut off the first. Oil company BP PLC’s latest plan will take six to eight days because welders have to assemble the boxes."
---
"Satellite images indicate the rust-hued slick tripled in size in just two days, suggesting the oil could be pouring out faster than before.

More than 6,800 square miles of federal fishing areas, from the mouth of the Mississippi to Florida’s Pensacola Bay, were closed for at least 10 days, beginning Sunday, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Administrator Jane Lubchenco said government scientists were taking samples from the waters near the spill to determine whether there was any danger.

The Coast Guard and BP said it was nearly impossible to know exactly how much oil had gushed since the blast, though it had been roughly estimated to be at least 200,000 gallons a day.

Even if the oil stays mostly offshore, the consequences could be dire for sea turtles, dolphins and other deepwater marine life — and microscopic plankton and tiny creatures that are a staple of larger animals’ diets.

Moby Solangi, director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport, Miss., said at least 20 dead sea turtles were found on the state’s beaches. He said that it was too soon to know whether oil contamination killed them but that it was unusual to have them turning up across such a wide stretch of coast, spanning nearly 30 miles."
---
Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2010/05/02...#ixzz0mxGpm0Oc



Cleanup operations
From: http://www.flickr.com/photos/49889869@N07/
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Last edited by RickI; 05-06-2010 at 08:40 AM.
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Old 05-04-2010, 09:37 PM
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Water Monkey, please see the following for a continuation of your thread:
http://fksa.org/showthread.php?t=9615

........

To help updates make more sense, I've split this topic into two threads including this one. Updates may or may not be made on a regular basis.

The original information websites should be used for reliance and not information posted here.

An important site for updates on combined response efforts to the spill is:
http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/go/site/2931/


The other thread on fksa.org pertaining to this spill:

Oil Spill - Florida, Cuba, Bahamas & Eastern Seaboard Prospects, Deep Horizon Blowout
http://fksa.org/showthread.php?t=9615
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Last edited by RickI; 05-04-2010 at 10:55 PM.
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Old 05-05-2010, 11:37 AM
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This and other full sized charts are available at: http://tinyurl.com/2787tcv


"BP Says One Oil Leak of Three Is Shut Off
BATON ROUGE, La. —For the first time since an explosion on a drilling rig 15 days ago left an undersea well spewing crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico, engineers succeeded in shutting off one of the three leaks from the damaged well late Tuesday night, a spokesman for BP said on Wednesday morning.
Though by itself the move was not expected to reduce the amount of oil being released — estimated at 210,000 gallons a day — it “does enable to us to make progress, to winnow down the focus from three leaks to two,” said the spokesman, John Curry."
Continued at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/06/us...ef=global-home

"Amount of Spill Could Escalate, Company Admits
This article is by John M. Broder, Campbell Robertson and Clifford Krauss.
WASHINGTON — In a closed-door briefing for members of Congress, a senior BP executive conceded Tuesday that the ruptured oil well in the Gulf of Mexico could conceivably spill as much as 60,000 barrels a day of oil, more than 10 times the estimate of the current flow."
Continued at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/05/us...ll.html?ref=us


Important daily updates worth checking regularly at:
http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/go/site/2931/


Including posting of "Shoreline Countermeasures Manual" for tropical coastal environments. It dates from 1993, hopefully needed updates learned since then will be provided although the current document entails a good deal of useful information. This document describes different types of shorelines, sand, rock structures, tidal flats, mangroves, etc. discussion of cleanup and countermeasures. For folks contemplating cleanup, it is a good thing to review. Spill response particularly once it interacts with shorelines and estuaries can be incredibly labor intensive. Lots of necessary work to go around. Authorities and designated contractors will likely provide oversight of most of these efforts.
http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse....c/2931/539351/


"BP pursues at least five ways to stop spill
By BRETT CLANTON, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, May 3, 2010, 10:18PM

BP says it is working on at least five possible approaches for halting the spew of oil from a damaged well deep in the Gulf of Mexico that is feeding one of the worst spills in U.S. history.
The company says all of the plans are moving forward simultaneously, even though some may turn out to be unnecessary or unsuccessful. But several of the ideas, once considered backup solutions, have begun to figure more prominently into the sweeping effort, including work on a subsea collection system for leaking oil and the drilling of a relief well to stop the flow from the damaged one."
Continued at: http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/...n/6988333.html


"Subsea oil recovery, relief well under way
Published: May 4, 2010, Offshore staff
ROBERT, Louisiana -- Work is under way to deploy a device on the seafloor to recover the leaking oil from the Deepwater Horizon incident, according to the Joint Information Center.
BP and Transocean are using Discoverer Enterprise to recover up to 125,000 b/d of oil with a purpose-built dome-like and connection system which is expected to be deployed on the seafloor by next week. The recovery system reportedly could collect up to 85% of the leak.
Meanwhile, Transocean’s Development Driller III is permitted to drill a relief well on Mississippi Canyon block 252 in 5,159 ft of water. The well is designed to intersect the existing wellbore and pump heavy fluids and cement in to stop the leaking oil. "
http://www.offshore-mag.com/index/de...pill-2010.html


Illustrations of efforts to stop discharge of oil under "Stopping The Oil Leaks"
http://hosted.ap.org/specials/intera...ill/index.html


ONE computer model of many under evaluation from USF that considers plume movement vs. currents (including the Loop Current). Other models are at the same site. CLICK IMAGE to access.

http://ocg6.marine.usf.edu/

.
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Last edited by RickI; 05-05-2010 at 09:59 PM.
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  #6  
Old 05-05-2010, 09:06 PM
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From Miami Herald, Claim HOTLINE FOR RELATED LOSSES:

"Florida opens oil spill hot line for businesses
A hot line is available to help Florida business owners affected by the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
Alex Sink, the state's chief financial officer, announced the hot line on Wednesday.
``Florida businesses can take steps now to help expedite delivering their claim to BP, as well as help themselves be ready to take advantage of federal and state aid that may become available for recovery,'' Sink said.
Business owners can call 1-877-My-FL-CFO or 1-877-693-5236 from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on weekdays. Information is also on the website myfloridacfo.com.
The specialists on the hot line will be able to answer questions about filing insurance claims, but the office said claims of damages and lost income must be filed with BP at 1-800-440-0858."
From: http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/05/0...#ixzz0n6vOWsgy


Information on the containment dome, pending placement attempt and controlled burn today. It was stated a similar approach was used for a release in Mexico about 20 years ago in only 200 ft. of water. This has never been attempted at a water depth remotely close to 5000 ft.




Short overview of release and solutions being pursued to stopping the leakage.




Potential cause explored on NPR:
"Cementing Becomes One Focus In Gulf Oil Probe, by ELIZABETH SHOGREN

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen burning on April 21 in the Gulf of Mexico. Federal investigators have turned their attention to the cementing process that occurred on the oil rig before the explosion.
A cementing job done by a Halliburton crew just hours before the oil accident in the Gulf of Mexico has emerged as a central focus of the investigation.
Bad cementing work has triggered leaks in the past, and some experts say it's hard to imagine a scenario where it was not part of the problem at the Deepwater Horizon well, too."
Continued at: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=126536457


Business Week - Some potential financial impacts of the release - May 5, 2010

"May 3 (Bloomberg) -- The growing oil slick fed by an underwater leak in a BP Plc well in the Gulf of Mexico may threaten production, shipping and refining of oil and natural gas in Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana.
Those three states account for 19 percent of U.S. refining capacity as of 2009, according to data from the U.S. Energy Department’s Energy Information Administration.
“Traders are nervous about how fast the slick could grow,” and whether it could have a significant effect on oil and natural-gas production, said Andy Lipow, president of Lipow Oil Associates LLC in Houston."
"Oil in the water could ignite another fire and the slick could emit dangerous fumes, putting offshore workers at risk, said Steve Rinehart, a spokesman for BP and the multiagency Joint Information Center coordinating the federal response.
Ships face the same potential hazards, and have the additional risk of interfering with clean-up efforts or tracking oil on their hulls into the Mississippi River, he said. So far, the Coast Guard hasn’t restricted commercial traffic, Rinehart said in a telephone interview today.
Three natural gas platforms have been affected by the explosion. One has been evacuated and production shut, another has been shut-in without being evacuated and the third was evacuated without being shut-in, he said. Rinehart wouldn’t identify the companies involved." Continued at: http://www.businessweek.com/news/201...-update2-.html






Photos from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/49889869@N07/
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Last edited by RickI; 05-06-2010 at 08:48 AM.
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Old 05-06-2010, 01:00 PM
Unimog Bob Unimog Bob is offline
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Thanks for all the links and info, Rick.

I found this article interesting.

http://blogs.reuters.com/environment...-valdez-spill/
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Old 05-06-2010, 08:22 PM
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Nice article, thanks for the link. It is good to look at other major spills and response or lack thereof. The Exxon Valdez was a particularly notable one. If we are unfortunate enough to have a major accumulation of oil along the shore in Florida there may be some serious impacts that may not be all that obvious in advance. The air quality may well take a major hit, both from volatile, semi-volatile organic compounds evaporating from the spill, but also from dead sea life. Those with respiratory sensitivities may need to relocate away from the shore for a while. Many years ago we excavated a very large quantity of petroleum contaminated soil from a former bulk ground storage facility (like in Port Everglades, only smaller). It was only about ten acres of impacted land! Petroleum had routinely been released there for decades through the last century. The odor during the excavation process was extremely strong. This despite the petroleum having been heavily weathered and bio-transformed to surrogate compounds. Some of the strongest I've encountered in almost 25 years of dealing with land based petroleum releases.

Also, even though the oil may float, a fraction of the components of the crude are water soluble. These shorter chain hydrocarbons are usually present in lesser quantities than the longer, less evaporation prone components in crude. Still there well may be enough to impact air quality and contaminate surface water. So even though the oil is on top, it can sometimes do plenty of harm beneath the surface.

Some of the nuggets from the Valdez article are noted below:

"I was not at all surprised when officials reported zero spillage, then projected modest spillage, and then reported spill amounts five times higher than their earlier estimates.

As the spill continues, I imagine that even the newly reported amounts will continue to vastly underestimate the actual spillage.

Underreporting of spill volumes is common, even though lying about self-reported spill volume is illegal – and a breach of public trust."

"Still, penalties are based on spill volume: Exxon likely saved itself several billion dollars by sticking with its low-end estimate of 11 million gallons and scuttling its high-end estimate of 38 million gallons, later validated by independent surveyors."

"BP will likely leverage the billions of dollars it will spend on the cleanup to reduce its fines and lawsuit expenses, despite later recouping a large portion of the cleanup cost from insurers or writing it off as a business expense as Exxon did."

There is still a lot more worth reading and considering in the article;
http://blogs.reuters.com/environment...-valdez-spill/

Good luck to us.
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Last edited by RickI; 05-06-2010 at 09:14 PM.
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Old 05-07-2010, 08:16 AM
Unimog Bob Unimog Bob is offline
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Venting. I literally was at EB thinking how beautiful it was and was amazed at all the fish I was catching (cuz I was using a pretty lame artificial and just wading).
I saw leopard rays jumping, urchins, (you know, sea critters).

Then, the thought of the oil leak got to me on the way home and I got pissed.

Going out there again to fish around 6 pm with Scott L.
Even a total newb could catch fish out there right now. It was pretty sick how many fish were biting right now.
Anyone wants to show, just show.
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Old 05-07-2010, 08:25 AM
Water Monkey Water Monkey is offline
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Default Agreed!

I agree....

I spend almost everyday in, on, or around the waters of Tampa Bay. I do this for fun and the great feeling of being surrounded by nature. Recently, I have started to make a living based on these surroundings. It saddens me to think that all of the beauty could be ruined, not by a Cat 5 hurricane, but by the greed of 'Big Oil'.

Hopefully this containment dome works and they can minimize this disaster. Blowing 25 and sunny with a beach covered in oil will keep even me out of the water. Not cool BP.
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